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KELTIK's DIY thread


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Guest keltik

Someone requested i do a couple write ups, so here they are. These are mostly specific to the EZ30/EZ36 motors but can be applied to most other Subarus.

If you thrash your car or drive in dirty dusty environments - you may need to do some items more often than stated.

Refer to the service schedule in your vehicles hand book for more info, its also a good idea to own a factory service manual for your manufacture year and model.


DIY info so far:

Air Filter, Oil and Oil Filter Change

Brake pad change

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Guest keltik

DSC00024.jpg?t=1239846202

Every 10,000kms or so...do this

Change oil and oil filter

Inspect and replace air filter if necessary

Time Required:

1 Lazy afternoon or an hour if youre in a hurry.

Step 1: Air Filter

Most people can figure this one out easy enough - but i took a photo as i was doing mine so im damned well going to use it.

Tools Required:

None

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Unfasten the 2 metal clips holding the cover on and lift cover out of the way.

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If your filter looks like this (it just lifts out by the way) you should probably replace it.

Replace with a Subaru genuine part. Can even be cheaper than a crap one from repco and the build quality of genuine filters is streets ahead of Fram/Valvoline/Repco Mystery Brand.

Take care to replace the filter housing correctly. It can be a bit of a pain - but perservere and once everything is clicked into place properly youll have a good seal around the filter.

Step 2: Change oil and Filter

The EZ series motors are very picky about which oil to use. They state either a mineral or semi-synthetic is reccomended. Fully synthetic can be run but is much harder to come by. Therefore use either;

5w30 for colder climates

10w40 for warmer climates or hard driving

Things you will need:

17mm Spanner or socket

12mm " " "

10mm " " "

A Pan or old oil drum to drain your waste oil into. I cut the side off a 10L bottle of diesel oil and use that as my drain pan.

6 Liters of good quality oil for the EZ motors and 5 Liters i believe for the 4cylinders.

Replacement Oil filter. Again - Subaru Genuine ones really are nice. And not too expensive at all. Take note the H4 filter should NOT be used on the H6 motor. Make sure youre given the right one!

Handy to have:

Roll of kitchen paper towels

2x Cold Stellas (or beer of choice)

Radio/iPod

Latex/Vinyl gloves

A good sturdy set of car ramps

An oil filter strap or socket

A funnel if you cant pour oil well

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Take the car for a 5minute drive to warm things up. You dont want to get the engine really hot, just warm enough so the oil will flow well. If you can still put your hand on the motor after the drive - thats the right temperature.

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Remove Undertray from car by undoing the 3 bolts along front bumper,

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2 bolts near steering rack

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and 1 screw in each front wheel arch.

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Once undertray is removed, unbox your nice new oil filter and make sure it looks the same as the one thats coming off. If you can read the part numbers its a good idea to check them. Nothing sucks more than draining all your oil out and realising you dont have the right filter.

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Remove dipstick from engine and put somewhere clean and safe. Then undo sump drain plug. If you have the drain pan aligned well and have a quick hand - you shouldnt spill any on your nice clean driveway.

Once all of the old oil has drained out, and your just getting little drips out of the drain. Replace the sump plug and tighten it up. Not too tight!! Maybe 1/4 of a turn after its seated. This is a soft alloy sump and you REALLY dont want to strip any threads.

Now move the drain pan to underneath the filter and begin to loosen it. I can do mine by hand easy enough but you might have to use an oil filter wrench or strap to loosen it.

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After one or 2 turns, most of the oil will quickly drain from the filter. People with 4cylinder motors shouldnt have this problem as your oil filter hangs straight down. Once oil has stopped flowing - you should be able to unscrew the filter and sit it on the ground without spilling a drop.

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Put a skim of oil around the rubber seal on the new filter. This allows it to slide against the seat untill it has sealed. Forgetting to do this often causes big leaks. Just dip a finger into the oil pan (filled with used oil) and spread some onto the seal.

At this stage you may want to pre-fill the filter. This reduces the amount of time your engine will be without oil pressure when you start it up. Some people say it isnt necessary but i do it just for peace of mind.

The filter will absorb a surprising amount of oil. Stop when it is about half full (for the 6cylinder people).

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With a quick hand, you should be able to screw it back on without more than a spoonfull leaking back out.

Turn the filter untill its resting against its seat on the motor - then tighten another 3/4 of a turn. It should feel tight but you dont need to put your back into it. Remember someone has to get it off again in 6 months.

Now come the extremely fun part. Pouring your nice golden new oil into the motor. If you have a steady hand, just pop off the bright yellow oil cap above the passenger side cams and pour away. Be carefull with pour speed as you may trap some air and burp a load of oil over your nice clean driveway. If your hand isnt so steady - use a funnel. Nothing looks more unproffesional than a load of spilled oil all down the front of your engine.

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For the EZ30, add exactly 5.4 liters of new oil. Smaller oil bottles have a measuring gauge on the side so you can figure that out.

Once youve added the oil. Check it on the dipstick. It may be hard to see because its so clean so check a couple times to be sure the level is somewhere between the high and low marks.

If the oil level is right, first wipe any spilled oil away from the sump drain plug and oil filter assembly, replace the filler cap and dipstick then hop into the car and start 'er up. Make sure you havnt left any tools under the bonnet beforehand. Make sure the oil light goes off within a few seconds of startup.

Let the engine run for 2 or 3 minutes. Then hop under the car and check for leaks. Everything should still be clean and dry. When i did this - i was still leaking the occasional drip from around the filter so i put an extra bit of turn onto it. Now all is well.

Reinstall the undertray and drive happy! After the first couple of drives - check the oil level again. It may have dropped slightly and become a darker color. If needed - add oil to between the high and low marks and youre all set for some more 'reliable' Subaru driving fun.

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Guest keltik

Will add more write ups as i do more stuff. If anyone wants something specific - ask and i might be able to help. And yes i do realise a lot of people will find this totally obvious but i like to think it will help at least oen person.

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yup good write up and lovely pics :)

one trap for young playas is the oilfiter O-ring staying on the housing and not on the filter,check that the O-ring is on the old filter before installing new one,2 0-rings are not better than one and it will leak oil all over your nice clean driveway :)

this is from personal experience :)

*oring = O-rings now*

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 keltik said:

And yes i do realise a lot of people will find this totally obvious but i like to think it will help at least one person.

One Person right here! Cheers Keltik. Im about to start the mission that is servicing... You done the Auto Gearbox fluid change before btw?

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Guest keltik

Yeah but no pics, and my method is less than ideal.

Drain, Refill, drive, drain, refill, finished.

Takes 10liters of atf to do that and you get massively improved shifts afterwards.

AC Delco fluid was the cheapest i could find.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest keltik

Changing Brake Pads: Interval varies greatly between drivers and cars.

Whenever worn below 2 or 3mm of friction material, your brake pads need changing. Heres how to do it on most 2 piston Subaru brakes (the most common type on turbo and 2,5/3.0l models).

Tools Needed:

19mm Socket and Power bar

17mm Spanner

14mm Socket and ratchet

A decent jack and axle stand.

Estimated time: 15 mins per side

Step 1.

Park car on a flat even surface, engage park brake/handbrake. Loosen wheel nuts about a half turn using the 19mm socket and power bar.

Have a picture....just because i love you

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Step 2.

Jack up car and secure it using the axle stand. You seriously dont want this falling on you when youre working under it. It will damage the driveway and the car....also your head may not enjoy it.

Now further loosen and remove the wheel nuts. The wheel should just flop off. If it doesnt, give the wall of the tire a good kick to break it loose.

Once the wheel is off, you should be seeing something like this.

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Step 3.

Undo this bolt using the 14mm socket and ratchet. Only this bolt needs to be undone and the caliper will swing up out of the way. It may be stiff, but persevere and it will swing upwards.

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Step 4.

Remove and replace the brake pads. They simply slide out of these runners. Simple. When you install the new ones, try to make sure they are sitting nicely and move freely in the runner.

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This is a worn brake pad with damage to its trailing edge from extreme use.

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Step 5.

Gently press the pistons back into the caliper to make room for the new brake pads. I use the handle from my hydraulic jack to do this. You can sometimes do it by hand or by using a monkey wrench. Press them all of the way back in, then swing the caliper back down over the brake pads.

DRFVDR: Just another wee hint if you put a used brake pad across both the pistons you can push them both in at the same time,also stops the likely hood of you forcing the other one out completly (= bad) and when pushing second one in the first one moving out again...

If it still doesnt fit. Press the brake disk firmly against the hub as it might have moved, then try reseating the pads and swinging the caliper down.

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Once the caliper is back down, Reinstall the 14mm bolt and tighten. It doesnt need to be insanely tight. I dont have the exact torque specs but get it as tight as it was when you undid it :P

Step 6.

Reinstall the wheel and torque the wheel nuts using the correct pattern. Then remove axle stand obviously and lower the car.

Torque the wheel nuts tightly once the car is on the ground.

Press the brake pedal gently a few times to pump fluid back into the brakes. Dont use long strokes, just a few short ones on the pedal. Once it feels firm, your good for the test drive.

Step 7.

Take your car for a test drive, head to a piece of road with a 100kph limit and very little traffic. Your brakes may not work well for the first few stops so beware and leave plenty of distance.

Follow the bedding in procedure for your brake pads. Avoid hard stops untill you have completed this.

This usually involves a few braking runs from 100kph to walking speed. Do not stop, keep rolling. And after you have done the recommended number of stops, drive at a constant speed to cool the brakes off. They might smell a bit but dont panic.

That should have the job finished.

All good for another year or so.

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I take off the lid to the brake reservoir, and push a brake piston thingy back, then look at the increased level of brake reservoir, and push another brake piston thingy back. At some stage, I normally have to remove some fluid from the reservoir with a dirty great syringe bought from the chemist for exactly this job.

You do not need to release pressure with brake nipple, the fluid magically finds its way up into the reservoir. And over the top if you don't remove some.

However, due to some track activities that the car participates in, I gnerally change brake fluid at the same time, since the car is already on jack stands and brakes exposed for bleeding.

Unless of course I'm in a hurry.

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Guest keltik

On my wagon with 2 pots, i could retract both pistons on one caliper fully without the reservoir overflowing. And yes using this method you dont need to bleed them again.

Still its a valid point to check the fluid level to make sure you dont go spilling nasty brake fluid everywhere.

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Guest boostin
 keltik said:

On my wagon with 2 pots, i could retract both pistons on one caliper fully without the reservoir overflowing. And yes using this method you dont need to bleed them again.

Still its a valid point to check the fluid level to make sure you dont go spilling nasty brake fluid everywhere.

And if you do, wash it away with plenty of water.

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Very good Ben,we will make a mechanic out of you yet:)

Just another wee hint if you put a used brake pad across both the pistons you can push them both in at the same time,also stops the likely hood of you forcing the other one out completly (= bad) and when pushing second one in the first one moving out again...

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if you have ABS you must release the bleed nipple and use a brake hose clamp on the hose or you can damage you ABS PUMP SEALS INSIDE THE PUMP DUE TO HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GOING BACKWARDS TO THE PUMP, i always loosen the bleed screw and clamp the brake hose just a habit i got into and covers ma ass doing perkys for people,

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 RAB B said:

if you have ABS you must release the bleed nipple and use a brake hose clamp on the hose or you can damage you ABS PUMP SEALS INSIDE THE PUMP DUE TO HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GOING BACKWARDS TO THE PUMP, i always loosen the bleed screw and clamp the brake hose just a habit i got into and covers ma ass doing perkys for people,

Um NO

the fluid will go back thru the pump just fine,I have never released the bleed screw when doing brake pads on ABS vehicles and I do maybe 20 sets a year never ever had an issue the ABS pump is designed to let fluid back thru it as this is how brakes work

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Guest boostin
 DRFVDR']

if you have ABS you must release the bleed nipple and use a brake hose clamp on the hose or you can damage you ABS PUMP SEALS INSIDE THE PUMP DUE TO HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GOING BACKWARDS TO THE PUMP, i always loosen the bleed screw and clamp the brake hose just a habit i got into and covers ma ass doing perkys for people,

Um NO

the fluid will go back thru the pump just fine,I have never released the bleed screw when doing brake pads on ABS vehicles and I do maybe 20 sets a year never ever had an issue the ABS pump is designed to let fluid back thru it as this is how brakes work

+1 on that. I never do either. I just force the pistons back slowly. Never had an issue.

[quote name='jake_the_muss said:

pressure going backwards? pressure can change, not move. fluid can go backwards though? :P

Picky picky. You know what he means.

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Guest keltik

Yeah sorry mate even the factory service manuals state to just push the pistons back in. Only bother undoing the bleeder if its too hard.

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 DRFVDR']

[quote name='jake_the_muss said:

pressure going backwards? pressure can change, not move. fluid can go backwards though? :P

/quote]

isnt that a vaccuum :)

vaccuum- no pressure

the "ideal" vacuum is a state with no pressure at all.

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  • 3 years later...

This is a very cool thread! Can we get more like this? More on the EJ motor though (being as more of us will have EJ series engines). I don\'t have any ideas on what I\'d like to see but basic stuff like this is always useful to idiots like me or the less mechanically minded among us. One thing I would like to see while I think about it is radiator fluid change in BE/ BH Legacy. Mine has a header tank and I\'ll be fooked if I know how to drain and refill radiator properly :(

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  • 3 weeks later...

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