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best polish to use so I don't get swirly patterns?


cpt kernow
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Title says it all.

I get the mean swirly marks after a polish. What's the best brand to use and anytrickery in doing it?

I've tried heaps of ways.

The best at the moment is to use a buffing disc on the cordless drill to apply then buff off by hand.

I always wait for a midly temperatured day and never in sunlight or high humidity

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Guest dynofiend

The best polish by a million miles is a product called Autoglym Super Resin Polish. In an indedpendant test by a guy on a detailing enthusiast website, it came out on top against about 20 other products, including Meguirs Scratch X, and many other products people swear by. Super Resin Polish not only has an extremely fine cutting compund to remove light swirls and scratches, but it also contains a polymer filler which can actually help to fill in smaller scratches. Its real easy to use too. I just apply it all over the car, small circles followed by longitudonal wipes for each small area. Then clean my windows and black trim etc. Then a quick wipe over with a microfibre cloth and its done. I used it all the time back in the UK, and had a devil of a time trying to find it here in NZ, but there is one supplier who I think is based in Wellington who advertises via trademe. His other clients include virtually all the prestige car garages in Wellies! Awesome stuff.

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 dynofiend said:

The best polish by a million miles is a product called Autoglym Super Resin Polish. In an indedpendant test by a guy on a detailing enthusiast website, it came out on top against about 20 other products, including Meguirs Scratch X, and many other products people swear by. Super Resin Polish not only has an extremely fine cutting compund to remove light swirls and scratches, but it also contains a polymer filler which can actually help to fill in smaller scratches. Its real easy to use too. I just apply it all over the car, small circles followed by longitudonal wipes for each small area. Then clean my windows and black trim etc. Then a quick wipe over with a microfibre cloth and its done. I used it all the time back in the UK, and had a devil of a time trying to find it here in NZ, but there is one supplier who I think is based in Wellington who advertises via trademe. His other clients include virtually all the prestige car garages in Wellies! Awesome stuff.

Yup I used to use autoglym all the time back home (worked in halfords lol) but struggling to find anything as good now. will look it up

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Autoglym is available in NZ

http://www.autoglym.co.nz/

If you're getting swirly marks after polishing you ain't doing right.

:P

For major cleans I use a four-step method with Meguiars products.

1. Wash with a good car detergent

2. Remove surface gunk with a claybar.

3. Attend to scratches with Scratch-X scratch remover.

4. Wax with NXT Techwax 2.0

At each step cleanliness of your cleaning cloths, brushes etc. is paramount to minimising swirling etc.

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Guest DVNT
 newsuba said:

Autoglym is available in NZ

http://www.autoglym.co.nz/

If you're getting swirly marks after polishing you ain't doing right.

:P

For major cleans I use a four-step method with Meguiars products.

1. Wash with a good car detergent

2. Remove surface gunk with a claybar.

3. Attend to scratches with Scratch-X scratch remover.

4. Wax with NXT Techwax 2.0

At each step cleanliness of your cleaning cloths, brushes etc. is paramount to minimising swirling etc.

man that sounds like alot of hard work ;D

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 DVNT said:

man that sounds like alot of hard work ;D

Nah...

Depending on conditions you only need to claybar, scratch-x once or twice a year.

Wax on... wax off... every 2-3months.

Even Autogylm benefits from some basic paint prep before applying.

;)

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 DVNT']

[quote name='newsuba said:

Autoglym is available in NZ

url]http://www.autoglym.co.nz/[/url]

If you're getting swirly marks after polishing you ain't doing right.

:P

For major cleans I use a four-step method with Meguiars products.

1. Wash with a good car detergent

2. Remove surface gunk with a claybar.

3. Attend to scratches with Scratch-X scratch remover.

4. Wax with NXT Techwax 2.0

At each step cleanliness of your cleaning cloths, brushes etc. is paramount to minimising swirling etc.

man that sounds like alot of hard work ;D

Not when you see the condition of Mike's car... ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...
 dynofiend said:

The best polish by a million miles is a product called Autoglym Super Resin Polish. In an indedpendant test by a guy on a detailing enthusiast website, it came out on top against about 20 other products, including Meguirs Scratch X, and many other products people swear by. Super Resin Polish not only has an extremely fine cutting compund to remove light swirls and scratches, but it also contains a polymer filler which can actually help to fill in smaller scratches. Its real easy to use too. I just apply it all over the car, small circles followed by longitudonal wipes for each small area. Then clean my windows and black trim etc. Then a quick wipe over with a microfibre cloth and its done. I used it all the time back in the UK, and had a devil of a time trying to find it here in NZ, but there is one supplier who I think is based in Wellington who advertises via trademe. His other clients include virtually all the prestige car garages in Wellies! Awesome stuff.

Youll find Ford dealerships sell it aye.

Also look up my sig for Driwash... does the same thing but you can use it on everything, windows, trim etc. Doesnt leave finger prints which is awesome for non-pillarless doors like Subs. Makes it easier to wash next time around and takes longer to get dirty.

Easiest application ive ever come across.

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 STiEVO said:

you got a sample pack swindog . if not how much is your stuff?

Not here mate but if your in Tauranga i can hook you up with Tony who'll do a demo on your car. Trust me, im anal about my car care and this stuff blew me away. Look up my sig and have a look through the products. You wont use anything else again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I tested on my corolla a while back, and it was rough...

Really bad paint - cut first with cutting paste with a hand cloth, can really get into it.

To get the nice look afterwards - I bought a proper buffer, 10inch one, low rpm. Do small areas at a time, in the shade if possible, and take your time. Removed all the swirls off corolla, and now it looks mint!

GT looks fab now too.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This (quoted below) is possibly the best advise that I have seen in this thread :)

There are really only two ways to combat swirl marks. One way is to polish them out, the other is to use a product that is laden with "filler". In some cases (Eg. If the paint thickness on the panel is low, making polishing a potentially risky option) using a filler is an appropriate option. But you should bear in mind that products such as AutoGlym's SRP are not a permanent fix - they will wash off in a relatively short period of time - think of it as 'make up' for your paint ;D

Although the advise below is 'Meguiars-centric', it is based on sound principles and time-proven results. Fundamentally, the product-of-choice accounts for only 20-30% of the outcome, with the primary determining factors being whether the product is used correctly and the quality of the prerequisite steps. (By that, I mean you shouldn't 'clay' a car that hasn't been washed thoroughly, or you'll just scratch your paint with the dirt. You shouldn't polish your paint before removing the bonded contamination with a clay bar, or you'll be working on an uneven surface, with sub-par results.)

Swirl prevention is just as important as swirl removal, and this is also touched on below. Making sure that you're not washing or drying your car with sponges or cloths that are covered in grit. (the biggest source of which is the dirt that you've already cleaned off your car if you're not rinsing out your wash-cloth in a different bucket) ..also, if you're using a clay bar and you drop it on the ground - you should immediately bin it. And if you're polishing, the same principle applies to your polishing & buffing cloths. If they get dirt on them, all you'll be doing is scraping that dirt over your freshly polished paint, instilling fresh swirl marks - so toss them in the wash and continue with a fresh/clean one. If you're waxing and the applicator gets dropped - grab a new one.

I have personally looked very closely at several "Waterless Wash" systems am yet to find one that I would be happy to use myself, or advocate for anyone else.

I'm looking at adding some "self help" resources to our website that people interested in vehicle detailing and general car care can use to learn more about various products and techniques for keeping cars looking their best. Please let me know if this is something that you'd find helpful, and I will focus on completing the guides and publishing them sooner rather than later...

 newsuba said:

Autoglym is available in NZ

http://www.autoglym.co.nz/

If you're getting swirly marks after polishing you ain't doing right.

:P

For major cleans I use a four-step method with Meguiars products.

1. Wash with a good car detergent

2. Remove surface gunk with a claybar.

3. Attend to scratches with Scratch-X scratch remover.

4. Wax with NXT Techwax 2.0

At each step cleanliness of your cleaning cloths, brushes etc. is paramount to minimising swirling etc.

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Cheers for the endorsement !

;)

Yes, most products will do a similar job, Meguiars is just what I had in my garage.

It's the old "not what you have but what you do with it".

Thanks for pointing out the two-bucket method and putting to rest the automotive application of the five-second rule.

;D

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 itsgotgo said:

i use zymol wax 8)

beautiful finish.

Yes, Zymol have some absolutely exceptional waxes. (We will offer their 'Vintage' product as an 'ultimate upgrade' for our details, though are yet to work for a client that is willing to pay that much extra for a 'Last Step Product')

However, it is worth pointing out that even the world's best wax will not 'fix' swirl marks, scratches, or etching and oxidization. These kinds of paint defects require re-leveling and refining of the painted surface, with the wax being used once the blemishes are removed, to seal the painted surface and provide a layer of protection. (Effectively 'locking in' all the hard work done to perfect the paint) :)

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Guest dynofiend
 PFS said:

This (quoted below) is possibly the best advise that I have seen in this thread :)

There are really only two ways to combat swirl marks. One way is to polish them out, the other is to use a product that is laden with "filler". In some cases (Eg. If the paint thickness on the panel is low, making polishing a potentially risky option) using a filler is an appropriate option. But you should bear in mind that products such as AutoGlym's SRP are not a permanent fix - they will wash off in a relatively short period of time - think of it as 'make up' for your paint ;D

After using SRP on a red car, your polish pad and cloth will be red, because it contains a mild cutting agent. This effect does not 'wash off'. Yes SRP contains some filling agents, which will after time, degrade and dissapear. But then so does ANY wax in exactly the same way. Autoglym also supplies a 'sealer' known as extra gloss protection, which seals and hardens the SRP filler effect.

Saying that SRP is a purely temporary effect is just wrong, and to my eyes, is nothing more than marketing blurb from Meguiars to stop you using it! Ive used the Scratch X product, and the Meguiars 3 step polish and wax, and the results, whilst good, are no where near as good as SRP. Polish your car once a month, and SRP is way better, way easier to use, and ultimately gets a better result on paint which isnt in amazing condition to start with.

Buying all three Meguirs products is also far more expensive than one bottle of SRP, and also will probably take near enough 20 times longer to reach the same result in terms of the finished effect. Granted, with the meguiars, this finished effect is probably longer lasting in that it has corrected the paint to the point where filling agents are no longer needed, but apply SRP 20 times...

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lol

...no, dynofiend's comments are also valid. I was unfair to the Autoglym product by insinuating that it's effects would wash off. The point I was making was that using a 'filler heavy' product will have a non-permanent effect - and Super Resin Polish does contain a fair amount of filler. This is not to say that it doesn't also have a polishing function, it's just a question of balance.

But - in fairness, it's not really meaningful to compare it to Meguiars 3-Step system. SRP is a (filler heavy) polish - great for achieving results on paint that doesn't have 'healthy' levels of clear coat to work with. The "Three Meguiars" ;) comprise a Polish, and a separate sealant, and a separate wax. Autoglym also have sealants and waxes which should also be considered for an "apples with apples" comparison of overall value.

But (as I alluded to in my first post) it is less a question of what product is used, so much as the skill and attention with which it is applied. There are many quality products that can be used to achieve incredible results on automotive paintwork, (less so in the 'consumer' end of the market unfortunately) - but by the same token, used incorrectly even the best products can leave poor finishes, or worse to irreparable damage.

For my part, I am 'brand agnostic', (I don't sell any products at this time) and I'm a firm believer in using the best product for any given application, rather than religiously sticking with a single vendor. (Which is probably why I have about 9 different polishing compounds from at least four separate manufacturers and an equal number of different polishing pads and cloths.) What is right for one particular vehicle will by no means be right for another, so if you find something that works well for you - stick with it! 8)

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