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CEL code 65 and 66


tydon
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Both Boost/Changeover related Codes. Have you been trying out the Parallel thing?

Have a read through this:

http://www.uklegacy.com/forums/index.php/topic/11043-code-66-and-boost-issueshow-to-clean-them-out/

Edit:

65-Differential Pressure Sensor

66-Sequential Turbo System.

Normally a gunked up hose or Solenoid inside the BBOD causes the CEL 66. Which then trips CEL 65.

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 Rosssub said:

:)

ECV_004.jpg

Edit: Put some Pliers on the Rod and push it downwards to open the Valve/ECV. You should be able to hear if it\'s closing properly.

so that eactuator rod winds in and out to hold and push the flap open? will go do that now im assuming this is on the secondary side?

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 tydon']

[quote name='Rosssub said:

:)

img]http://s25.postimg.org/mvzjxs4z3/ECV_004.jpg[/img]

Edit: Put some Pliers on the Rod and push it downwards to open the Valve/ECV. You should be able to hear if it\'s closing properly.

so that eactuator rod winds in and out to hold and push the flap open? will go do that now im assuming this is on the secondary side?

Yes Secondary/Drivers side.

Inside the Actuator is a Vac Diaphragm connected to the "Rod".

Vacuum to the Base of the ECV Actuator opens the ECV (Exhaust Control Valve) slightly for pre-spool.

Boost pressure to the Top Section of the Actuator opens the ECV completely after the Secondary Turbo has Spooled (reached target PSI at the Differential Pressure Sensor).

Edit: Pretty much, if you can pull the Rod upwards "at all" then your Rod needs adjusting. It should be tight/up/closed.

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 tydon said:

well it sounded like it was opening and closing fine i didnt hear any metal on emtal sound butthe rod pulled back up and u can hear the air pushing through

If you push the Rod down then let it go, it should slap shut.

I think you more likely have a Solenoid/BBOD clean out issue. Give your Primary Boost Solenoid inside the Passengers Guard a clean out too.

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 Rosssub said:

Both Boost/Changeover related Codes. Have you been trying out the Parallel thing?

Have a read through this (BBOD Clean out):

http://www.uklegacy.com/forums/index.php/topic/11043-code-66-and-boost-issueshow-to-clean-them-out/

Edit:

65-Differential Pressure Sensor

66-Sequential Turbo System.

Normally a gunked up hose or Solenoid inside the BBOD causes the CEL 66. Which then trips CEL 65.

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  • 2 months later...

Hmm this thread may be more relevant now to my situation than the dumb question thread. I had both codes 65 & 66 myself. Code 65 seems to have been removed by putting some carby cleaner through the BBOD and hoses directly connected to it. When I bought the car it was in "parallel" turbo mode, hose 1 was blocked off and where it goes on the IACV had a little cap over it. Now. The car seems to trip code 66 in the higher gears, for example today I was in 5th and put my foot to the floor to try get it to trip the CEL, it got to about 3300rpm in 5th before what felt like fuel cut happened and then going into limp mode with a solid CEL.

The car is a 1998 BD5C RS, EJ20R, manual, with 108k on the clock but was also parked up for 4 years, apparently has a chipped ecu, headers and "big bore" exhaust. I also cleaned out the primary boost solenoid today with no effect on code 66. I can't comment on whether the car has lost power or not as I have not driven it or any twin turbo legacy long enough to know what they really go like, only a V7 STi which definitely felt much quicker, cleaning out the BBOD did make it feel smoother and like it had more power early on. Would a faulty ECU be a possibility here? Both single and twin turbo modes feel fine to me until code 66 is tripped.

EDIT: Had a read through this: http://clubsub.org.nz/forum/showthread.php?32559-Idiots-guide-to-converting-your-legacy-to-parallel

Looks like I may have to go through all the checks here as this sounds like what happens to me: "In theory you can now go for a drive, and then watch the check engine light come on after the first few times you floor it. " And I see hose 8 is where it should be.

Edited by Skatieguy
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 les666 said:
I found when I got code 66 it was due to the secondary bypass valve leaking. I replaced that and haven't had it appear again.

I don't really know how to check for a faulty one so I'm going to try what I linked in the edit first, looks like its possible someone just switched it over to parallel turbo and didn't hook hose 8 into hose 22. Will check all other mentioned things as well though. Just want it to get running without CELs before I try anything different.

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 Skatieguy said:
I don't really know how to check for a faulty one so I'm going to try what I linked in the edit first, looks like its possible someone just switched it over to parallel turbo and didn't hook hose 8 into hose 22. Will check all other mentioned things as well though. Just want it to get running without CELs before I try anything different.

"I thought I would share my experience with the dreaded code 66 so that hopefully someone else can benefit. I recently bought a 1994 BG5 twin turbo with a damaged gearbox. I got it cheap but because of the gearbox problem I could not really test drive it properly but the previous owner assured me that apart from the gearbox issue there is nothing wrong with the car. Needless to say, after installing a new gearbox from the wreckers I took the car for a drive only to find that as soon as it starts to boost I get a CEL and it turned out to be code 66.

After a little bit of cursing I got over my urge to pay the guy a visit in the middle of the night and sat down and started reading. The information floating around the web is very useful, although some of the supposed remedies are not. I am not one to go into something and start messing around cleaning things without first finding a fault. Too many times I have read of people thinking they have fixed the problem only to come back a day or so later saying they the problem is back.

I connected a couple of boost gauges one to the primary side of the intercooler and one to the secondary so that I could see what was going on. Primary boost would come on to about 5-7psi then back off as the gate opened in the intercooler and the exhaust valve opened up. The boost would not come back and the CEL would come on!! Without typing an essay listing absolutely everthing I did, in short I wired open some valves, closed off others, blocked some vacuum hoses and moved around the boost gauges until I could get an understanding on what was going on.

I came to the conclusion that the secondary turbo was indeed spooling but the charged air was disappearing. Why the primary turbo was only producing 7psi I will get into soon, but I tested the boost solenoid in the LH wheel well and that was working.

I removed the solenoid box (valve box), connected the wires under the dash and tested each solenoid. All were working except one - the one that opens to the absolute pressure sensor which is in the solenoid box. The solenoid metered out OK in ohms (around 40) but the ECU was not switching it. I manually earthed the solenoid and it operated fine. I double checked it by swapping some wires with another one and the solenoid was definitely fine so I guess the ECU does not trigger this one in test mode and this is not the cause of any issues.

As a side note, the solenoids can be disassembled very easily and cleaned with a solvent, blown out and reassembled with not too much trouble. It also gives for a good opportunity to inspect the internals for damage or wear.

I also think I know why some people get 45 errors after cleaning the solenoids - the absolute pressure sensor on some models sits at the top of the solenoid box (the only device with only 1 hose attached). Spray carby cleaner or solvent in that thinking it is a solenoid and you will probably ruin it.

So, next I thought that the secondary bypass valve (blow off valve) may have not been switching properly or have been slow to operate between preperatory cycles and supercharging so I simply rewired the hose instead of going through the solenoid box and being switched in two modes (allowing for preperatory spinning, and then charging) I made it function with no preperatory stage. Simply take the vac hose from the primary side of the manifold (#3 I think) and stick it onto the secondary bypass valve in place of the one coming from the solenoid box.

Took the car for a spin and no 66 error. A pretty bad VOD but I could definitely feel primary spool, exhaust valve open and the boost drop off, and then the second turbo kick in. I reconnected the solenoid box and tested again. CEL and 66 error straight away.

I then removed the secondary bypass valve and blew down through it as if the turbo were spooling - the air came out of the pilot hole where the vac hose connects. The diaphram had split inside the valve . I replaced the valve and yippee we have both turbos, only a very small VOD and NO CEL lights I can see that valve failing quite often - it is not the same as the #1 BOV as it allows venting under pressure until positive pressure is applied to the pilot hole.

Anyways, we now have boost with no CEL but only 5-7 PSI. I had already tested the boost control solenoid so I knew that was not the cause. I looked deeper and found that some dim wit had removed the orifice in hose #23 off the primary wastegate line. Obviously with this missing the boost control solenoid is as good as useless.

I didn't have a spare so I used the on from the #2 hose as a guide for size and then sorted through some Weber idle jets in my collection until I found one that suited. I think it was a 50F8 from memory an I cut it in half and shoved it in #23.

A quick spin around the block and yippee we have 12psi primary, back off to around 4 in the VOD and then back up to 12 and with a rise to 13 before the gear change.

The short of this is, I have studied the hell out of the pneumatics and electronics that control the turbos on these cars and feel that I have a pretty good handle on it now. Don't go spraying too much carby cleaner around unless you actually find something worth cleaning. I have read too many reports of people ending up with more issues. Check your secondary bypass valve with it removed from the car. If you don't have a spare one and you are getting 66 codes, re route the vac hoses and retest (I probably need to take some pics to illustrate what I mean here. It works well and all you get is a slightly longer VOD).

If anyone is getting 66 codes and have not found the cause yet, I hope this helps.

Sorry for the lengthy waffle.

Edited by chesty, 09 August 2009 - 12:29 PM."

http://www.uklegacy.com/forums/index.php/topic/96441-my-code-66-story/

Small excerpt from thread in UK. Follow the link if you want to read some more.

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 les666 said:

So, next I thought that the secondary bypass valve (blow off valve) may have not been switching properly or have been slow to operate between preperatory cycles and supercharging so I simply rewired the hose instead of going through the solenoid box and being switched in two modes (allowing for preperatory spinning, and then charging) I made it function with no preperatory stage. Simply take the vac hose from the primary side of the manifold (#3 I think) and stick it onto the secondary bypass valve in place of the one coming from the solenoid box.

Took the car for a spin and no 66 error. A pretty bad VOD but I could definitely feel primary spool, exhaust valve open and the boost drop off, and then the second turbo kick in. I reconnected the solenoid box and tested again. CEL and 66 error straight away.

I then removed the secondary bypass valve and blew down through it as if the turbo were spooling - the air came out of the pilot hole where the vac hose connects. The diaphram had split inside the valve . I replaced the valve and yippee we have both turbos, only a very small VOD and NO CEL lights I can see that valve failing quite often - it is not the same as the #1 BOV as it allows venting under pressure until positive pressure is applied to the pilot hole.

Anyways, we now have boost with no CEL but only 5-7 PSI. I had already tested the boost control solenoid so I knew that was not the cause. I looked deeper and found that some dim wit had removed the orifice in hose #23 off the primary wastegate line. Obviously with this missing the boost control solenoid is as good as useless.

I didn't have a spare so I used the on from the #2 hose as a guide for size and then sorted through some Weber idle jets in my collection until I found one that suited. I think it was a 50F8 from memory an I cut it in half and shoved it in #23.

A quick spin around the block and yippee we have 12psi primary, back off to around 4 in the VOD and then back up to 12 and with a rise to 13 before the gear change.

The short of this is, I have studied the hell out of the pneumatics and electronics that control the turbos on these cars and feel that I have a pretty good handle on it now. Don't go spraying too much carby cleaner around unless you actually find something worth cleaning. I have read too many reports of people ending up with more issues. Check your secondary bypass valve with it removed from the car. If you don't have a spare one and you are getting 66 codes, re route the vac hoses and retest (I probably need to take some pics to illustrate what I mean here. It works well and all you get is a slightly longer VOD).

I just tried this, code 65 reappeared but I hadn't reset the ECU so 66 was still there too. I took it for a quick drive, got CEL (65 this time?) but no fuel cut/any cut over 3500 when the CEL hit. What are the chances of this being my issue?

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Take the secondary relief valve out and suck on the vac hose nipple, if the diaphragm is torn you will be able to suck air through it. If it's not torn then sucking should open the valve.

I'd say you have some hoses wrong or maybe a hose still blocked (from parallel). If you put it into diagnostic mode, does the ECV and IACV function properly?

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 Rosssub said:
Take the secondary relief valve out and suck on the vac hose nipple, if the diaphragm is torn you will be able to suck air through it. If it's not torn then sucking should open the valve.

I'd say you have some hoses wrong or maybe a hose still blocked (from parallel). If you put it into diagnostic mode, does the ECV and IACV function properly?

They seem to work at the start and then slowly stop with the ECV stopping first, the ECV opening/closing about 4 times before slowly getting weaker, and the IACV a bit more. Are they supposed to just keep going?

EDIT: I also found this while trying to remove the secondary relief valve; is it supposed to be in there? Looks like it completely blocks it.

MWo8etT.jpg

Edited by Skatieguy
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No that shouldn't be in there, that will be the cause of your CEL.

If the ECV/IACV only cycle a few times you might have a small vac leak somewhere, maybe the tank itself? But at least they are functioning. With the engine off the BBOD uses the stored vac in the vac tank to operate valves, they fade out as the tank runs out.

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Still getting code 66 :( turned up around 3k rpm just driving normally, feels sluggish don't know if it's just me seeing as I'm not used to twin turbo, but it felt much better acceleration wise back before the CELs first turned up.

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 Skatieguy said:
Still getting code 66 :( turned up around 3k rpm just driving normally, feels sluggish don't know if it's just me seeing as I'm not used to twin turbo, but it felt much better acceleration wise back before the CELs first turned up.

Have you got a boost gauge? What's it getting to?

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No boost gauge sadly, I think I can hear the bpv going off, I only got to drive it for 50kms (parallel) before I was first hit with these CELs. but when I got home it would at least push you into the seat a bit, even after putting hose 1 back onto the IACV IIRC it would accelerate well enough. After the first 2 gears.

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