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Changing a fuel pump


spark_38
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I thought i'd take a few photos since i've assisted in the changing of fuel pumps about 4 times this week... start with the back seats out if its a sedan or coupe

Tools required:

No.2 philips screwdriver

6mm blade screwdriver

long nosed pliers

8mm socket, 1/4" is best

side cutters, butt crimp terminals, crimping tool

cable ties

Step 1.

Locate factory fuel pump location, usually in the boot drivers side. Remove the cover by taking out the 4 philips No.2 screws

01coverremoved.jpg

Step 2.

Use the long nose pliers to remove the clips holding the hoses on and push them aside, the fuel feed line is usually a clip-lock fitting; use pliers to hold clip and wedge with flat screwdriver. Use the screwdriver to wedge the plug clip and unplug also

02hosesandplugoff.jpg

Step 3.

Remove the 8mm bolts being careful not to drop them. Lift the pump out adn tilt it slightly to the side so the level float does not get caught

03pumpoutremove8mmboltsfirst.jpg

Step 4.

Take complete assembly and work outside. It is a good idea to use the metal cover over the tank to stop dust getting in. Use pliers and move clips aside and slide off stock pump - the aftermarket ones fit on in the same manner. For the Ver 3/4 WRX and earlier models with the fatter style pump you need to cut the wires and crimp them to the aftermarket pump. Ver 5/6 WRX and above the factory plug fits straight into a Walbro pump (not sure if other pumps are the same, but Walbro seem a popular aftermarket choice). Use cable ties to hold the wiring in place and stop it rubbing against the sharp edges of the mounting bracket. I used a large cable tie at the base as wel to hold in place as the stock rubber bung was too big.

04pumpchangedandconnectorscrimped.jpg

Here is a picture of size comparison between the stock V3/4 pump and the aftermarket one:

05sizecomparisontostockV4pump.jpg

Step 5.

Drop the pump back in. Put the 8mm bolts in first and then the hoses and clips, the feed line should lock in place with a click - give it a few pulls to ensure a tight fit (the earlier models V1/2 use a scew type hose clip for this - and the feed line is the middle one). Make sure it's plugged in and put the cover back on... and seats back in

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Good work!

What i'd mention is before opening the lid, brush off and vacuum out all the dust and rubbish! the one in the pics is clean enough to eat off - compared to what i've seen! you certainly dont want a pile of dirt in your fuel tank :)

also if you damage the small fuel hose link, remember to replace with fuel-rated hose!

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  • 1 month later...

take the back seat out and you will see a plate with 4 screws holding it down, remove plate and hey presto theres ya fuel pump hiding underneath it, some cars you can get to it just by pulling the carpet etc outa the boot, but im not sure about a forester

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WRX GC8 Sedans you don't need to remove the rear seat & also its a good I deal to make sure the fuel level is not to high & becareful not to bend the fuel level float arm.

I used to also put a little bit of silicon sealer on the gasket too because some cars would have a bad fuel smell even weeks later.

Very good Post with good pics ;D

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 98WRX (PEASANT RACING) said:

WRX GC8 Sedans you don't need to remove the rear seat & also its a good I deal to make sure the fuel level is not to high & becareful not to bend the fuel level float arm.

I used to also put a little bit of silicon sealer on the gasket too because some cars would have a bad fuel smell even weeks later.

Very good Post with good pics ;D

NEVER use silcon to seal fuel systems

Petrol eats silcon then it blocks pickup etc

If you refit correctly, no leaks or smells

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 98WRX (PEASANT RACING) said:

WRX GC8 Sedans you don't need to remove the rear seat & also its a good I deal to make sure the fuel level is not to high & becareful not to bend the fuel level float arm.

I used to also put a little bit of silicon sealer on the gasket too because some cars would have a bad fuel smell even weeks later.

Very good Post with good pics ;D

dont mind the smell ay was high for weeks when mine was done ;D ;D

joking ;)

another good write up for the learnid ones

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Just found on your pics that the white plastic "Jet" valve is missing from the return pipe

This must be fitted, this works to draw fuel from L/H side of tank over to pick up on R/H side

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Sorry You are correct about STD RTV silicon when IMMERSED in fuel it will break down.

You can buy RTV that is fuel safe- It is used on modern diesel engines & in the

Aerospace industry ACC-SILICONES AS1810 (ESP411)

In this case the gaskets can get very old & even bolted down evenly –you can get

A very bad fuel smell which can be very dangerous if people are smoking in or

Around your car,

On the fuel tanks there is a little lip so nothing can fall in & we used to use a very very tiny

bead around the outer edge of the bolts & this will stop the fuel vapour escaping.

Up to you if you don’t mind the fuel smell? ;D

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Legend!

Nice write up. Is it safe to assume that the procedure will be the same for a 97 STB forester and that WRX pumps are the same (or pretty much all of that period?)

Cheers guys.

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 simonsez said:

thanks for the quick response to my questions zarnah will check it out tomorrow (car is stranded at work!)

Lol, thats my story right now haha

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 dayl said:

Legend!

Nice write up. Is it safe to assume that the procedure will be the same for a 97 STB forester and that WRX pumps are the same (or pretty much all of that period?)

Cheers guys.

Yip most subaru's that i've done have used the same pump... not sure when the crossover year was that they changed from the big size pump and the smaller size (maybe 1999/2000) - but they all fit in the same bracket in the same manner, only difference is tabs used for power and the plug in type - the proper walbro ones come with the proper subaru plug too so no need to cut or crimp wires just plug in

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  • 1 month later...

Should I be worried about the negative terminal being not insulated?

I really would like to insulate it to be safe - what do I use? Have you got any suggestions about stuff around the house I can use?

Thought of fuel hose but I would have to wait till Tuesday to buy some.

I guess I could use tie wraps to keep the metal connection away from the L-arm, but would prefer to protect it.

Any ideas?

31052009004.jpg

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The manufacturer had the bolted connections bolted straight onto the fuel pump viz

31052009002.jpg

I've swapped it out for a Walbro, and now there's 2 floating bolted connections. The +ve bolted connection will be insulated by the original rubber boot.

I'm worried that the -ve connection is floating when it didn't used to be, and wondering whether it's a problem when it hits the large bracket?

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Guest boostcut

na i wouldnt think there would be aye... theyre both earthed... if your worried you could use a cv boot clip and tie it up some how...

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