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cut, polish, scratch removal, general detailing questions


Kiwi_Fozze
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 kwi_fozze']

[quote name='Swindog said:

capful of kerosene in a 10ltr bucket of suds. Use a good mitt. Chamois off dry. Use a good mild cut compound and then carnuba wax over top.

/quote]

whats a good cut compound? (brands)

There are all much of a muchness. Just depends on the level of cut you require. And get one thata compatible for clear coat paints.

3m, mothers, meguires and them all do good jobs.

A clay bar can help too before you start the cut coat.

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Note using kero on you paint... not a good idea lol.. if your after removing any type of wax/grease get a proper grease& wax remover.. I\'m no painter, but am a panelbeater, I would give the whole care a nice wash.. give the whole car a good hard buff with an electric buffer, using cutting compound, so a fairly abrasive compound, wasting your time doing the cutting by hand.. once you have got a nice scratch free car or close to to, depending how deep the scratched were to start with, as cutting will only knock the scratches in the clear back.. then to remove the swirl marks from buffer use a hand polish and go over the whole car.. then give it a nice wash..

Note: If you do use an electric buffer, be very careful around any plastic areas , Including , bumpers, moldings etc, as the buffing wheel and the plastic get hot fast and you WILL burn right back to plastic.. So go low speed on plastic areas haha,

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 subaru-mania said:

Note using kero on you paint... not a good idea lol.. if your after removing any type of wax/grease get a proper grease& wax remover.. I\'m no painter, but am a panelbeater, I would give the whole care a nice wash.. give the whole car a good hard buff with an electric buffer, using cutting compound, so a fairly abrasive compound, wasting your time doing the cutting by hand.. once you have got a nice scratch free car or close to to, depending how deep the scratched were to start with, as cutting will only knock the scratches in the clear back.. then to remove the swirl marks from buffer use a hand polish and go over the whole car.. then give it a nice wash..

Note: If you do use an electric buffer, be very careful around any plastic areas , Including , bumpers, moldings etc, as the buffing wheel and the plastic get hot fast and you WILL burn right back to plastic.. So go low speed on plastic areas haha,

Nothing wrong with kero if diluted properly. Its a cleaning agent in its basic form anyway.

A capful in a 10litre bucket is absolutely fine. It helps removed bugs and tar with little to no effort.

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I thoiught i would chuck a few things in here, having done a few years in the booth myself.

Firstly Kero- cmon guys this isn\'t 1970, PREPSOL or Wax/Grease remover is available everywhere, and is better for your paint. Just use 2 rags, 1 wet 1 dry and it will clean your paint up like new!

Repairing scratches, Chips etc can be done well, or make your car look even worse. Make sure they haven\'t gone to the metal and started to rust, if so it will need to be preppd and resprayed. If not the rust will work it\'s way under the paint and boom you got rust \'worms\' creeping through.

If they are just light and gone to the primer then sweet, just grab a fine tip brush(Whitcoulls etc) and dab a few layers or your colour-lightly thinned/hardner (colour code matched of course) into the chip/scratch, wiping off excess. IF you have a base/clear finish then you will need to dab a few layers of clear over your colour-make sure the base colour is dry though. The aim with the clear is to \'fill\' the chip/scratch so that the clear is level with the finish around it, this goes for \'2pak\' finishes also.

Allow to dry-if possible over night, if in a hurry a hair dryer on low, at a ditance that wont blow the clear/colour about, in intervals will be fine. After about 30 mins the clear/2pak will be be setting, once cooled down will be ready for cutting/buffing.

Cutting/Buffing is actually a bit of an art. When done with care, patience, and a bit of know how, one can make even the most basic paint finish really pop! A mate of mine in WGN did this as his job at a reputable auto refinisher and was dam good at it. He has done quite a few show cars, hot rods and Daily drivers. He was uber fussy and patient.

Light scratches can be cut back using a decent compound(not too abrasive) and an electric buffer. Use a decent one with a bit of \'oomf\' as it will become useful when coming to the buffing. When your cutting use a spray bottle of water through out the process, it helps keep the heat down and will help your compound go that bit further. Keep checking the pad, we used to run a peice of sand paper over the foam disc to clear any old compound and bring a new foam surface out. Pressure is key, too light and the compound wont do it\'s job, too much and you risk burning through. Keep the buff moving and work in sections, use masking tape over plastic trims, window seals etc. This way you can get right to the edge and not have to worry about tearing off trim or the buff grabbing and being torn out of your hands-it does happen, beleive me. Dont put the pad flat, use on an angle-say a section around 10 and 3 on a clock.

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Once you have cut back the surface/area and are happy that the finish is up to what you want, give it a final wipe off being careful not to wipe dry compund back over the surface. If you have access to a compressor use this as you wipe, blowing just ahead of your rag. Be sure to wipe all compound off before you do the final buff other wise if it gets dragged back on to the surface while doing the final buff you will get light scratching and will have to start again.

Now it\'s time to get polishing, personallyi love to use a Lambs wool. The preferred polish product to use is not overly important, it\'s the technique that will make the difference. The idea of buffing is to get heat in to the clear/2k and \'reflow\' the surface to mirror finish. We are not cutting back anything but softening the surface just enough for it to become pliable, and reworkable. This where the \'oomf\' comes in, if you use a wimpy buff you will not get the heat into the surface. Again check the pad surface through out, if needed use a peice of sand paper run against the face of the wool to clear it, as done with the foam pad. Do one sweep of the panel, checking the surface at different angles/light to spot any light marks/swirling. If all is going well, do one final sweep with lightened pressure (less heat) and recheck for any imperfections etc. Wipe off any polish that has been flicked off and your nearly done. Give the beast a wash, a dry with a Shammy and your ready for a beer-or 6 8) 8)

Once you have gone through the process and see the results you will appreciate your car/paint alot more. It\'s hard work but well worth the effort. If you are worried about mucking it up or don\'t have access to the tools etc, get a professional to do it. It will be worth the money and is a darn sight cheaper than a respray ;D

A bit of a long speil but i thought i\'d share my knowledge on the subject and hopefully give you an insight into what it takes to do the job properly and get the well deserved results.

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  • 1 month later...

just throwing my 2 cents into the mix aswell. Im a groomer for work and we start by washing the car then going over the whole thing with prepsol then using our cutting compound by hand to get the light scratches out then a buffer for the deeper ones. Then time for another wash to get all the excess product off then we go through and clean door shuts boot shut and under the bonnet while spraying silicone over all the plastics to bring up that nice shine then we do windows inside and out then finally time for hand polish. we use comercial grade stuff from pacer and it is amazing! bloody expensive though. o and dont forget to lightly wet whatever you use to apply the polish, it will make it go further. The tricks of the trade ;)

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