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Going to put my big brakes on my legacy soon and was wondering how exactly to bleed them, (I know the basic principle of how to do it, someone on the brake pedal, someone on the bleed valve etc) but I have only ever done them on my dirtbike, which is easy peasy, do I have to bleed them in a certain order ie: drivers side first, then passenger side? any help would be great.cheers

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Guest boostcut

start from the left rear then right rear then left front then right front... this technique has worked for me well over the 6 years ive been a mechanic also itd pay to flush it right thru as you dont know what or how those new brakes have been treated service related....

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im just changing the fronts, will I have to bleed all four? also by flushing it right through do you mean I should just bleed all the old brake fluid right out through the system and start afresh? also whats a good fluid to use?

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 boostcut said:

start from the left rear then right rear then left front then right front... this technique has worked for me well over the 6 years ive been a mechanic also itd pay to flush it right thru as you dont know what or how those new brakes have been treated service related....

aint that back to front? - well it is compared to my Hillman (light years of difference mechanical wise I know)

google result :

http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/f68/bleeding-forester-brakes-19742/

hahah gravity feed!

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start with the closet brake caliper to the master cylinder pumped the brake pedal several times and held it to the floor ,loosen the 7mm bleeder nut ,i had a clear hose from the bleeder nipple to a glass jar with brake fluid in it ,with the person still holding pedal to floor then opened the bleeder just enough to watch the old fluid come out. I used the ate super blue fluid so i could watch when the new blue came out. You must keep the master cylinder topped up at all time so you don't get air in the system, you do this as many times per brake line until old fluid is pumped out.I worked my way from shortest brake line to longest. I not absolutely positive that this is the right subaru procedure, I can't remember where i found my info but i normally search the forums. MY brakes have been working great since the brake upgrade, and i recommend going to the scoobymod brake booster adjustment i did a couple weeks ago and it was great improvement. Hope That helps.Don,t open the bleeder to far or it can suck air in their also.

This is from jokers link above

So when pumping brakes it that with car on or off?

and im doing front swap aswell so only front will need doing unless i get air in right?

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things like brakes really need to be done properly..

get yourself a copy of the service manual or a haynes, your asking for trouble following the mis-information that is clubsub.

anyway here is the page you need buddy (covers abs and non-abs)

just save it on your pc then zoom in with paint or pshop so you can read it..

brakes_subie.jpg

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things like brakes really need to be done properly..

get yourself a copy of the service manual or a haynes, your asking for trouble following the mis-information that is clubsub.

anyway here is the page you need buddy (covers abs and non-abs)

just save it on your pc then zoom in with paint or pshop so you can read it..

doh! I actually have a haynes manual, spose I shoulda looked there 1st!!! lol and just for your information club-sub is not a lot of "mis-information" in fact I have managed to probly save myself thousands of dollars on labour etc on my car from the helpfull info provided on the forums here- engine swap by myself etc.

Sometimes the "right" way isnt always the easiest or even the best way and everyone on here has real world tips and information from things they have learnt by doing it themselves.

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Hey guys - just did rear pads in my B4 as a one-man-bleed - made up a little bleeding kit using an old glass jar, some 6mm hose from bunnings and a bit of patience..

549977_10151552274897174_1330980220_n.jp

Worked a charm. New DOT-4 fluid was green in colour compared to the milky brown old fluid.

How-to-bleed-one-man-style (B4):

1) Used a turkey baster to draw out most of the old fluid from the master cylinder. Below about half way you have to get creative as there are obstructions and tanks in the reservior - I used a length of plastic tube to syphon fluid out as the baster cant get all the way to the bottom of the chamber.

2) Refill the master cylinder with clean fluid.

3) Add some brake fluid to bleeder jar; enough to immerse end of plastic tube (I zippied a bolt on the end to keep it on the bottom)

4) attach other end of tube to bleeder screw and loosen.

5) Pump brake pedal 8-10 times slowly - checking reservoir hasn\'t dropped too low - top off if required.

6) Check line regularly - when fluid changes colour (or runs clear if you are using a clear fluid) and there are no bubbles in the line, close bleeder screw and you\'re done!

* If you arent getting much flow from the caliper, loosen the bleeder a little more. Be careful not to loosen too much or air will be admitted to caliper on \'Up\' stroke of pedal.

* Be very careful with fluid as it is highly corrosive to painted surfaces! - Oh and dispose of it carefully - it can cause fires if mixed with some household chemicals....

* Someone mentioned that you shouldnt go all the way to the floor when depressing the pedal in case you damage the master cylinder seals. Im not sure how accurate this is, however logic dictates that you don\'t normally use the full travel of the pedal, and so the rest of the shaft/cylinder could have corrosion/contamination which could in theory damage the piston seals. (I don\'t imagine this would be a big problem but hey, better to be conservative right?)

45452_10151552304932174_394682861_n.jpg

Oh and have a read of the manufacturers bedding in procedure for their brakes - Bendix have instructions on their website for these pads I picked up from Super Cheap Auto. Run up to 50 and brake moderately-firmly to walking pace then drive for a wee while. Repeat 8 times allowing pads to cool slightly between applications. I took a drive around the block and jumped on the anchors as described above. I know it\'ll take a few moderate runs to get them to bed - anyone else got a \'tried and true\' technique they can share?

Cheers

Marcus

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this is interesting and makes sense, l was old school starting at the furthest rear working to the the front but it makes sense thinking about it starting at the front coz its taking the air out as it goes down the lines

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